Kentucky Geological Survey

Mike Lynch

A recent large landslide that killed more than 30 people in Washington has renewed national focus on such hazards.  Mike Lynch updates us on landslides in Ky.

Mike Lynch

The Kentucky Geological Survey's Mike Lynch has this report on an experimental method of destroying CO2 emissions.

Was That An Earthquake Or Something Else?

Mar 5, 2013
Mike Lynch

LEXINGTON, Ky. - A November 10th earthquake in Letcher County showed that Kentucky really is "earthquake country".  The Kentucky Geological Survey's Mike Lynch has this report on a new seismic monitoring station in Hazard, Kentucky.

A small excavator rolls up just behind the Perry County Public Library with a 9-inch wide augur to drill a five-foot deep hole.           

LEXINGTON, Ky. - In 2008, the Lexington Fayette Urban County Government and the U.S. EPA came to an agreement on improvements to Lexington’s sanitary sewers to reduce the accidental overflow of untreated sewage into area streams. That agreement has resulted in studies by several UK departments into the water quality of the region.  Mike Lynch reports on research work being done on one local watershed by the Kentucky Geological Survey.

LEXINGTON, Ky. - The word landslide can sometimes mean different things to different people.  Politicians hope they'll be on the plus side of a landslide, but if you are a homeowner whose property butts up against a hill, a landslide can take on a very different and literal meaning.  The Kentucky Geological Survey's Mike Lynch has the story.

LEXINGTON, Ky. - You've probably heard of the concerns many scientists have expressed about the effects of human-generated carbon dioxide on our planet's climate.  Electricity generating plants and other industries emit millions of tons of the gas into the atmosphere every year.  The Kentucky Geological Survey at UK has been doing research on ways to store captured carbon dioxide in deep formations under ground.  Mike Lynch reports.

LEXINGTON, Ky. - The Kentucky Geological Survey's Mike Lynch is back with his series of What Lies Beneath Us reports.  This one examines important archeological work going on at nearby Shaker Village.

Visitors to Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill usually come for a relaxing stroll among the restored buildings and to experience the songs, dances, and other practices of the people who built the 19th-Century community in Mercer County, Kentucky.          

Is Your Well Water Really Safe To Drink?

Mar 4, 2013

LEXINGTON, Ky. - If you happen to live outside a major city, your drinking water might come from a well or cistern.  The question you might want to ask is how safe is that water to drink?  The Kentucky Geological Survey's Mike Lynch has this What Lies Beneath report.  WARNING:  Some of the material discussed may make you a little queasy.

“We just lower it down manually….…We’re at water level now.”

HART CO., Ky - Sinkholes have been back in the news of late.  The Kentucky Geological Survey's Mike Lynch has this report on KGS's effort to monitor and map sinkholes across the Commonwealth.

Geologist Jim Currens of the Kentucky Geological Survey was literally poking around a Hart County property in March checking for sinkholes… One had opened up after a few days of heavy rain.