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NPR Story
4:50 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Rep. Akin To Challenge Sen. McCaskill In November

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 11:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Yesterday was a day for people in some states to vote in primary elections. Kansas Republicans unseated some of their own lawmakers who were seen as too willing to cooperate with Democrats, and we'll have more on that in a moment.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We'll also report on a primary vote that affects this fall's contest to control the Senate. Democrats hold an advantage in the Senate now. Republicans have many opportunities to gain seats or even win control.

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NPR Story
4:50 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Romney's Welfare Ad Slams Obama

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 11:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The latest clash between President Obama and Mitt Romney is over an issue dating to the 1990s - Bill Clinton's welfare overhaul. That law has a work requirement which is supposed to help move people off welfare and into jobs. Mitt Romney is now accusing the Obama White House of undermining the law, which the Obama administration calls an outright lie. We asked NPR's Ari Shapiro to do some truth squadding.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: First the accusation. The Romney campaign's new TV ad says Barack Obama has gutted the welfare laws.

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NPR Story
4:50 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Conservatives Oust Moderates In Kansas GOP Senate Primary

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 11:52 am

Transcript

FRANK MORRIS, BYLINE: And I'm Frank Morris. In Kansas, GOP primary election night was really a tale of two parties: one in a big, fancy hotel ballroom with a live band and lots of VIP soirees upstairs.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE HOOTING AND CHEERING)

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Business
4:50 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 11:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with markets rather optimistic.

Stock market averages in Asia closed higher today for the third day in a row. There's apparently a feeling that the U.S. and Europe are poised to make moves that will help the global economy. Investors are betting that the Federal Reserve will launch new stimulus action. And they're also betting that some decisive action will be taken soon to reign in the fiscal crisis in Europe.

Middle East
4:50 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Egypt Aims Missiles At Militants In Sinai

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 9:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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Around the Nation
4:50 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Shootings, Violent Protests Put Anaheim On Edge

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 11:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We've been hearing, in recent days, about the city of Anaheim here in Southern California. Violent protests shook that city following police shootings of two Latino men. Tensions there remain high, and tonight the city council will hold a special meeting to hear residents' concerns. But as NPR's Carrie Kahn reports, some community members say their complaints have long been ignored in what they say is a city that cares more about Anaheim's big businesses than about them.

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Sweetness And Light
3:27 am
Wed August 8, 2012

How Can You Really Measure The Greatest Olympian?

Before U.S. swimmer Michael Phelps broke the record for the most medals, did anyone say the precious record-holder, gymnast Larisa Latynina, was the greatest Olympian?
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 11:52 am

I always like it when Olympic champions from one sport go to another competition, so I was particularly touched to see Kobe Bryant, with his children in tow, watching as the magnificent Michael Phelps bid adieu to his sport by winning yet one last gold.

Phelps and Bryant are connected these days, too, because both have prompted some historical conversation. Kobe boasted that his current U.S. basketball squad could beat the sainted Dream Team of '92, while Phelps, simply by piling up more medals, opened up the barroom debate about who might be the greatest Olympian ever.

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Books News & Features
3:26 am
Wed August 8, 2012

With 'Last Book Sale,' Lit Giant Leaves One More Gift

Booked Up Inc. helped put author Larry McMurtry's hometown on the map when it became one of the largest used bookstores in the country.
Donna McWilliam AP

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 12:54 pm

Larry McMurtry is perhaps best known for novels like The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment and Lonesome Dove; but the author also has a career as a bookseller.

His store, Booked Up, spills across four buildings in his small hometown of Archer City, Texas, and houses nearly half a million rare and used books. But starting this Friday, McMurtry is holding an auction to whittle down that number — by a lot.

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First And Main
3:25 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Florida Market Draws Candidates Like Bees To Honey

Parkesdale Farm Market is run by Jim Meeks, 70, and his extended family, including his daughter-in-law Xiamara Meeks, 36. Business is booming and the stand has been a mainstay on presidential campaign stops since the days of George H.W. Bush.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 7:36 pm

As the presidential election nears, Morning Edition has begun a series of reports from an iconic American corner: First and Main. Several times in the next few months, we'll travel to a battleground state, then to a vital county in each state. In that county, we find a starting point for our visit: First and Main streets, the intersection of politics and real life.

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Environment
3:15 am
Wed August 8, 2012

A Clear And Present Danger: How Glass Kills Birds

Experts say glass buildings kill millions of birds every year. Scientists at Powdermill Avian Research Center are studying ways to help prevent this. Here, a volunteer tags a black hooded warbler in Rector, Pa., in May.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 12:05 pm

First of a two-part series. Read Part 2.

Modern architecture loves glass. Glass makes interiors brighter and adds sparkle to cityscapes. But glass also kills millions of birds every year when they collide with windows. Biologists say as more glass buildings go up, more birds are dying.

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