Josh James

Reporter / Webmaster

Josh James fell in love with college radio at Western Kentucky University's student station, New Rock 92 (now known as Revolution 91.7). After working as a DJ and Program Director, he knew he wanted to come home to Lexington and try his hand in public radio.

In 2003, he joined WUKY as a part-time reporter and weekend announcer. He's earned several awards from the Kentucky Associated Press, including Best Radio Documentary in 2005. An avid music fan raised on The Beatles and British Invasion rock, James also enjoyed a stint in the programming department, hosting WUKY's Rock & Roots from 11-1 pm weekdays.  He currently works as a reporter and webmaster for the station. When he's off duty, James enjoys songwriting, philosophy, and kicking back with his cat, Brooklyn.

Ways To Connect

School-based decision making councils would see their influence diminished under a bill passed by the Senate Education Committee Thursday.

Josh James / WUKY

Differences remain between the House and Senate over their respective heroin bills, but committees are working to reach a consensus.

Josh James / WUKY

With voting rights legislation for former felons stalling year after year in Frankfort, the annual rally for House Bill 70 can feel like a case of déjà vu for supporters.

Josh James / WUKY

For Kentuckians unaware of penalties for failing to sign up for health insurance, opening their taxes this year could be a rude awakening. That’s why Gov. Steve Beshear has announced he’s adding an additional sign-up window between March 2 and April 30 for last-minute customers.

Legislation opponents say will pave the way for large-scale hydraulic fracking in Kentucky sailed through a Senate committee Wednesday. This comes a day after a House panel approved identical legislation.

liftkentucky.com

A letter sent to state lawmakers by Ford, General Electric, and other major utility users could spell trouble for a local option sales tax bill.

Josh James / WUKY

Legislation proposing deregulation of landline phone services emerged from the Kentucky House for the first time Tuesday. The controversial measure – generally referred to as the AT&T bill – would also release carriers from the obligation to require basic services to customers in urban areas. During floor debate on the bill, Rep. Rick Rand listed reasons why freeing up more money for AT&T upgrades would benefit Kentucky.

Josh James / WUKY

Animal welfare advocates populated committee rooms and the Capitol Rotunda Tuesday, urging votes on a pair of bills aimed at curbing dog fighting and keeping animals sheltered.

A House panel voted Monday to revive an anti-fraud law designed to curb solicitation of motor vehicle accident victims – that’s despite a 2014 ruling finding the measure unconstitutional.

Josh James / WUKY

The state would borrow a record $3.3 billion to prop up the ailing teachers’ retirement system under a bill approved by the Democratic-led House Monday.

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