Josh James

Reporter / Webmaster

Josh James fell in love with college radio at Western Kentucky University's student station, New Rock 92 (now known as Revolution 91.7). After working as a DJ and Program Director, he knew he wanted to come home to Lexington and try his hand in public radio.

In 2003, he joined WUKY as a part-time reporter and weekend announcer. He's earned several awards from the Kentucky Associated Press, including Best Radio Documentary in 2005. An avid music fan raised on The Beatles and British Invasion rock, James also enjoyed a stint in the programming department, hosting WUKY's Rock & Roots from 11-1 pm weekdays.  He currently works as a reporter and webmaster for the station. When he's off duty, James enjoys songwriting, philosophy, and kicking back with his cat, Brooklyn.

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Josh James / WUKY

There's a new fiscal sheriff in town. Gov. Matt Bevin made that much clear in  his first budget address to a joint session of the General Assembly Tuesday night.

AP

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray's name will be on the ballot in the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate race.  Today was the deadline to file and Gray was  in Frankfort turning in the paperwork this morning.

AP

As Gov. Matt Bevin puts the final touches on his first biennial budget and State of the Commonwealth address, state agencies are bracing for the possibility of fresh cuts. The chief executive has taken tax increases off the table - meaning pensions, expanded Medicaid rolls, and other obligations could eat into any new post-recession spending. 

Tom Godell / WUKY

Lingering concerns continue to swirl around the long-awaited CentrePointe project and what role the city might take in the future development.

Josh James / WUKY

Senate Bill 68 - commonly called the "Dog Bite Bill" - once again sailed through a Senate committee Tuesday. The measure comes in reaction to a 2012 State Supreme Court decision altering the interpretation of Kentucky law to make landlords the legally liable for dog bites occurring on or about rental properties.

Josh James / WUKY

Another round of priority bills will soon land in the Kentucky House's inbox.

Josh James / WUKY

Nonviolent former felons seeking to delete low-level Class D felonies from their record might get that chance under a bill that cleared state House of Representatives Friday, but the legislation will likely come under closer scrutiny in the Senate.

Josh James / WUKY

The Kentucky Senate has passed its first bills of the 2016 session, a measure targeting prevailing wage and two bills drafted to update antiquated alcohol laws and buoy the state's burgeoning bourbon industry.

http://www.johnson.kyschools.us/schools/wr/

Legislation filed by a GOP state senator aims to address controversies like the one that arose in Johnson County last year when  a school production of A Charlie Brown Christmas had the Bible verses removed after a complaint was received.

Josh James / WUKY

It's been all quiet on the legislation front in the House and Senate since lawmakers embarked on the 2016 session, but that's expected to change tomorrow as the upper chamber takes up its first high priority bills. Meanwhile, many of the measures winding through committee carry an air of déjà vu.

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