Josh James

Reporter / Webmaster

Josh James fell in love with college radio at Western Kentucky University's student station, New Rock 92 (now known as Revolution 91.7). After working as a DJ and program director, he knew he wanted to come home to Lexington and try his hand in public radio.

In 2003, he joined WUKY as a part-time reporter and weekend announcer. He's earned several awards from the Kentucky Associated Press, including Best Radio Reporter in 2014 and 2016. An avid music fan raised on The Beatles and British Invasion rock, James also enjoyed a stint in the programming department, hosting WUKY's Rock & Roots from 11-1 pm weekdays.  He currently works as a reporter and webmaster for the station.

When he's off duty, James enjoys songwriting, philosophy, and kicking back with his cat, Brooklyn.

Ways to Connect

Josh James / WUKY

Kentucky Republican leaders have tamped down expectations surrounding contentious “religious freedom” and transgender bathroom legislation in the weeks leading up to the 2017 session, instead emphasizing their business-friendly docket. But the cultural hot buttons, which could also impact the state's economy, appear alive and well in the General Assembly.

Josh James / WUKY

While the snow fell in Kentucky Thursday, there was a flurry of debate inside the state House and Senate as Republicans leveraged their supermajorities to pass their first bills – among them a 20-week abortion ban, "right-to-work" legislation, and new medical review panels.

Josh James / WUKY

Republicans flexed their new legislative muscle Wednesday, sending long-sought-after bills blocked in past sessions by Democratic House majorities out of committee and onto the larger chambers.

Josh James / WUKY

The Kentucky Capitol is covered in scaffolding for repairs, but inside another work is in progress as the GOP craft their new supermajority in the state House. On opening day of the 2017 legislative session, there was visible enthusiasm among Republicans.

Josh James / AP Images

WUKY News is looking back on five Kentucky stories that defined 2016 and what they might mean for 2017.

Child Development Center of the Bluegrass

For nearly 60 years, the Child Development Center of the Bluegrass has served children across the region, with an emphasis on special needs. This week, we go inside the center with executive director Erica Tipton.

Josh James / WUKY

Republican lawmakers in Frankfort anticipate a busy 30-day session as the party looks to leverage supermajorities in both chambers to pass a slate of long sought-after legislation.

Josh James / WUKY

The Lexington Herald-Leader has highlighted two cases between 2012 and 2013 where former professors accused of violating the school’s harassment and discrimination codes reportedly left the university with settlement deals promising that UK would not disclose those allegations to future employers.

Office of Kentucky Attorney General

Kentucky has signed on to a multi-state lawsuit accusing a large group of pharmaceutical companies of conspiring to reduce competition and inflate the price of generic drugs.

An attorney representing Lexington t-shirt maker Hands On Originals told Kentucky Court of Appeals judges Tuesday that his client did not violate the city’s fairness ordinance by refusing to print shirts for a 2012 gay pride festival.

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