Josh James

Reporter / Webmaster

Josh James fell in love with college radio at Western Kentucky University's student station, New Rock 92 (now known as Revolution 91.7). After working as a DJ and Program Director, he knew he wanted to come home to Lexington and try his hand in public radio.

In 2003, he joined WUKY as a part-time reporter and weekend announcer. He's earned several awards from the Kentucky Associated Press, including Best Radio Documentary in 2005. An avid music fan raised on The Beatles and British Invasion rock, James also enjoyed a stint in the programming department, hosting WUKY's Rock & Roots from 11-1 pm weekdays.  He currently works as a reporter and webmaster for the station. When he's off duty, James enjoys songwriting, philosophy, and kicking back with his cat, Brooklyn.

Ways To Connect

AP

The man who oversaw major changes in the state’s academic standards over the last six years is stepping down in August. Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday announced the decision Wednesday.

LRC Public Information

2015 marked the first year for a new reporting requirement for business and other groups registered to lobby in Frankfort.

AP

The debate over Indiana’s controversial new religious freedom law is also prompting new questions about Kentucky’s version.

Two weeks ago, Boone County became the latest – and largest – Kentucky county to adopt a policy Republicans in the General Assembly hope will one day be the norm across the entire state. And the county’s leaders believe it will stand up in court.

AP (Timothy D. Easley)

Monday GOP gubernatorial contender and Agriculture Commissioner James Comer detailed his healthcare recommendations for Kentucky, the first pillar of a five-point plan to be released in the coming weeks.

Josh James / WUKY

Hard hit Kentucky coal communities will be the target of up to $38 million in federal grants aimed at reviving local economies. It's all part of what’s being dubbed the “POWER Initiative.”

AP

Attorney General and presumptive Democratic gubernatorial nominee Jack Conway has some strong words for a Republican lawmaker who criticized his job performance on the Senate floor during the closing hours of the 2015 legislative session.

Josh James / WUKY

While Governor Steve Beshear and other state leaders are praising the 2015 session as one of most productive sessions in recent years, several major debates were left unresolved, including how best to plug a massive funding hole in the Kentucky Teacher Retirement System.

Josh James / WUKY

Attorney General Jack Conway has nothing but positive reviews for the heroin bill recently signed into law by Gov. Steve Beshear. The Democratic gubernatorial candidate was on hand Thursday at the University of Kentucky to deliver kits designed to put a stop to overdoses.

Josh James / WUKY

The final hours of the 2015 General Assembly saw passage of several measures billed as signature pieces of legislation, including a last minute compromise to shore up the state’s ailing Road Fund, but the session did not conclude at its usual hour.

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