Josh James

Reporter / Webmaster

Josh James fell in love with college radio at Western Kentucky University's student station, New Rock 92 (now known as Revolution 91.7). After working as a DJ and Program Director, he knew he wanted to come home to Lexington and try his hand in public radio.

In 2003, he joined WUKY as a part-time reporter and weekend announcer. He's earned several awards from the Kentucky Associated Press, including Best Radio Documentary in 2005. An avid music fan raised on The Beatles and British Invasion rock, James also enjoyed a stint in the programming department, hosting WUKY's Rock & Roots from 11-1 pm weekdays.  He currently works as a reporter and webmaster for the station. When he's off duty, James enjoys songwriting, philosophy, and kicking back with his cat, Brooklyn.

Ways To Connect

Josh James / WUKY

While lawmakers took action to stabilize Kentucky's dwindling gas tax revenue in the waning hours of the 2015 General Assembly, the state's road fund is still expected to take a nearly $140 million dollar hit this fiscal year. And no concrete plans are on the table to make up for the lost receipts.

Karyn Czar / WUKY

For the past nine years, Fayette County Public Schools officials have been improperly handing out surplus dollars to schools -- that's the conclusion of a Kentucky Office of Education Accountability investigation. The report lines up with previous findings by district officials.

Josh James / WUKY

A simple glance at the numbers shows Lexington is becoming an increasingly globalized city – and local officials are hoping a new outreach center dubbed Global Lex will ease the transition for international newcomers.

Josh James / WUKY

Pedestrians making their way down Lexington’s Short Street might notice the trek just got a little friendlier.

lfucg

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray has appointed a political newcomer to fill a vacant seat on the Urban County Council.

AP

A protest launched at the Kentucky State Fair Country Ham Breakfast Thursday ended with three attendees walking out in handcuffs.

Josh James / WUKY

Countless families were left separated and homeless in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina a decade ago, but the catastrophe brought one family closer together as they resettled in Lexington.

AP

Kentucky’s legal costs for defending its same-sex marriage ban all the way to the Supreme Court could be in the millions.

lexingtonky.gov

76 trees in Lexington’s Hamburg area are slated for removal next week. As Josh James reports, the city wants to halt the spread of an invasive beetle.

Pages