Josh James

Reporter / Webmaster

Josh James fell in love with college radio at Western Kentucky University's student station, New Rock 92 (now Revolution 91.7). After working as a DJ and program director, he knew he wanted to come home to Lexington and try his hand in public radio.

In 2003, he joined WUKY as a part-time reporter and weekend announcer. He's earned numerous awards from the Kentucky Associated Press, including Best Radio Reporter in 2014 and 2016. An avid music fan raised on The Beatles and British Invasion rock, Josh also enjoyed a stint in the programming department, hosting WUKY's Rock & Roots from 11-1 pm weekdays.  He currently works as a reporter and webmaster for the station.

When he's off duty, Josh enjoys songwriting, philosophy, and watching bad horror movies with his cat, Rufus.

Ways to Connect

Josh James / WUKY

A 1934 University of Kentucky mural that was covered following a campus controversy over its depiction of African-Americans working in the fields is set to be re-unveiled Thursday.

Josh James / WUKY

While Washington dealt with the fallout from Monday's confirmation of an FBI investigation into pre-election ties between Russia and the Trump campaign, the president was in Louisville, Kentucky rallying his base at Freedom Hall.

AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley

This Saturday, Lexington constituents plan to hold a town hall meeting to air concerns about the direction of the state and the nation – even if invited lawmakers don’t show.

Josh James / WUKY

Lawmakers are working against the clock to find consensus on a number of bills from charter schools to Real ID Wednesday, their final chance to pass legislation before the governor weighs vetoes.

Post-ACA Predictions For Kentucky At Odds

Mar 14, 2017
Greg Stotelmyer

A spokesman for the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy says an Affordable Care Act replacement under consideration in the U.S. House of Representatives would be felt in a big way in the commonwealth, but supporters see it as the first step toward state-driven reform.

AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley/Susan Walsh

With Republicans working to sort through their differences over post-Obama health reforms, Kentuckians heard two starkly different assessments of the new GOP plan over the weekend.

AP Photo

The United States Constitution spells out two processes for amendments, but so far in the document’s 230-year history only one has actually been used. Now, there’s a steady drumbeat in state legislatures – including Kentucky’s – to invoke the second.

Josh James / WUKY

Attorney General Andy Beshear would see his powers scaled back under a bill substitute filed by Senate President Robert Stivers. The late-breaking change adds more fuel to an ongoing political clash between the top law enforcement official and leading Republicans.

Josh James / WUKY

A bill making the targeting of police officers and other first responders a hate crime is on its way to the governor's desk.

CC0 Public Domain / pixabay

Kentucky is close to lifting a decades-old moratorium on nuclear waste storage in the state. While Senate Bill 11 also clears a path for the construction of nuclear power plants, a reactor in the commonwealth would still be a long way off.

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