Alan Lytle

News Director

Bitten by the radio bug as a teenager, Alan Lytle got his start start more than 30 years ago volunteering in Clermont County, Ohio for WOBO-FM. He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree  in Broadcasting from the University of Cincinnati and worked at a variety of radio stations in the Cincinnati market, then made the move to Lexington in the mid-1990s.

Lytle has served as WUKY News Director since 2002 and been the recipient of numerous Associated Press, CASE, and Communicator awards. He took home AP's Best Radio Anchor award in 2016. When not covering news, Lytle enjoys cheering on the Wildcats (and Bearcats) and hanging out with his pet beagle, Howie. He recently earned a Master’s degree in U.S. History from the University of Kentucky.

Ways to Connect

Lane Report

This week on the Business Side Lane Report executive editor Mark Green shares with Alan Lytle some of the takeaways from a recent in depth interview with Fazoli's president and CEO Carl Howard.

Associated Press

Two men are looking at some serious jail time after a federal grand jury indicted them for distributing carfentanil, a synthetic opioid 10,000 times more potent than morphine, which resulted in seven overdoses last month in Rowan County.

UK College of Public Health

A new documentary that exposes the darker side of the temporary staffing industry will have a special showing this week at the University of Kentucky.  The College of Public Health and other departments are screening and discussing the award winning film “A Day’s Work” Friday from noon to two in room 223 in the multi-disciplinary science building.

Kentucky Heritage Council

This week marks the the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act and the Kentucky Heritage Council is holding a day-long celebration this Friday.  WUKY's Alan Lytle talks with the Heritage Council's Diane Comer about the event and what the NHPA has meant to the Commonwealth.

UK VIP Center

The University of Kentucky’s Violence Intervention and Prevention Center held an informal gathering today where people were encouraged to speak out about instances of racism they’ve either witnessed or experienced on campus.

Alan Lytle

When it opened in 1904 Patterson Hall on the University of Kentucky campus became the first women’s dormitory at the school.  Today, some 112 years later the state’s flagship university celebrated the renovation of the historic building as well as the many women pioneers who passed through its doors. 

Josh James / WUKY

Things got lively at the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees meeting Friday  in Bowling Green.  The Lexington Herald Leader reports that three on the panel spoke out about the university’s lawsuit against the Kentucky Kernel, the school’s independent newspaper.

Alan Lytle

Family, friends, and hundreds of caring members of the  Lexington community came together at the UK Arboretum Saturday morning for a public memorial service to mark the tenth anniversary of the 49 lives that were lost in the Comair 5191 plane crash near Blue Grass Airport. 

UK Now

This weekend marks the ten year anniversary of the crash of Comair Flight 5191 in Lexington.  Many of the 49 people who perished that day had ties to the state's flagship university.  Larry Turner was the associate dean for extension in the UK College of Agriculture and the director of the cooperative extension service.  He was on his way to a conference in Puerto Rico that morning.  Dr. Jimmy Henning, who succeeded Dr. Turner in that position shares some of his fond memories of a life well-lived but tragically cut short.

Celebrities, Bourbon And Brand Hoarding This Week On The Business Side

Aug 15, 2016
Associated Press

This week on the Business Side Alan Lytle talks with Justin Thompson, editor in chief of The Bourbon Review about film actor Matthew McConaughey's new multi-year contract with Wild Turkey as the brand's creative director and what that might mean for the bourbon industry.  They also talk about the disturbing trend of secondary marketeers scooping up limited edition bottles of bourbon, much like a ticket scalper, then selling the collectibles for inflated prices.  Is there anything distilleries can do about this?  Should they care?