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National Security
3:04 am
Tue May 1, 2012

After Bin Laden, Al-Qaida Still Present As Movement

Thousands of Somalis gathered at a militant-organized demonstration on the outskirts of Mogadishu, Somalia, in support of the merger of the Somali militant group al-Shabab with al-Qaida, which was announced in February by al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 8:16 am

A year ago Tuesday, Navy SEALs attacked Osama bin Laden's secret compound in Pakistan and may have fundamentally changed al-Qaida as we know it.

The Obama administration's top counterterrorism chief, John Brennan, spoke Monday in Washington, D.C., and seemed on the precipice of talking about the terrorist group in the past tense.

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Business
2:59 am
Tue May 1, 2012

N.H. To The Unemployed: Try An Unpaid Internship

Electropac in Manchester, N.H., is among the companies participating in the state's unpaid internship program.
Sheryl Rich-Kern for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 6:47 am

Electropac, a firm that makes printed circuit boards in New Hampshire, once had 500 paid employees. Today, it has 34. But thanks to a state program for the unemployed, it also now offers unpaid internships.

Across the country, unpaid internships are on the rise for older adults looking to change careers or rebound from layoffs. In New Hampshire, a state-run program encourages the unemployed to take six-week internships at companies with the hope of getting a permanent job.

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Business
2:57 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Discovering The True Cost Of At-Home Caregiving

Maryland resident Ida Christian, 89, began showing symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in 2009. Her condition demands around-the-clock care.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:51 am

Walk through any nursing home, and your first thought might be: "I need to take care of Mom myself."

Few people want to turn over a loved one to institutional care. No matter how good the nursing home, it may seem cold and impersonal — and very expensive. But making the choice to provide care yourself is fraught with financial risks and personal sacrifices.

Those who become full-time caregivers often look back and wish they had taken the time to better understand the financial position they would be getting themselves into.

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Music Interviews
7:02 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

How To Break Up With Attitude, According To Norah Jones

Norah Jones' latest album is called Little Broken Hearts.
Frank Ockenfels Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 8:38 am

More than 10 years ago, Norah Jones hit the national stage with her melancholic love song "Don't Know Why," in the process selling millions of copies of her debut album and becoming a Grammy winner.

But Jones' new album is different. She may sound like a fragile performer, but don't get her wrong: At 33, she's recorded a breakup album with attitude.

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The Two-Way
6:58 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Protests Planned Across The United States To Mark May Day

The Occupy movement will try to regain the momentum it created last fall.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

A collection of activists — from labor unions to immigrant rights groups — are planning protests across the country tomorrow to mark May Day.

Of course, the highest profile organization is Occupy Wall Street, which has called for a "general strike" and says events are planned in 135 U.S. cities.

Here's how the movement describes its plans on its website:

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The Two-Way
6:10 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

More Than 100 Dead In India After Ferry Capsizes

More than 100 people are dead after an overcrowded river ferry sank in India today. The AFP reports the ferry sank after being split into two by a storm.

The AFP adds that about 100 others were missing:

"As rescuers struggled in heavy rain to find survivors weeping relatives lined the shores of the fast-flowing Brahmaputra river in Assam state, desperate for news of family members on board the vessel.

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Race
5:37 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

A Museum Teaches Tolerance Through Jim Crow

Museum displays include examples of robes worn by the men, women and children of the Ku Klux Klan.
Bill Bitzinger Ferris State University

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 3:33 pm

This story contains offensive language.

The ugliness of racism is at the heart of a new museum in Michigan. The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State University in Big Rapids features thousands of troubling artifacts and sometimes horrifying images. There are slave whips and chains; signs that once dictated where African-Americans could sit, walk or get a drink of water; and teddy bears turned into messengers of hate.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:34 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Studies Reignite Mammography Debate For Middle-Aged Women

Karen Lindsfor, a professor of radiology and chief of breast imaging at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, examines the mammogram of a patient with heterogeneously dense breast tissue. Lindfors is among those doctors who say there was insufficient evidence to support the idea that additional screenings would detect cancers earlier.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 8:37 am

Should women in their 40s routinely get mammograms to detect breast cancer?

Two studies released Monday aim to help resolve that question, which is one of the most intense debates in women's health. The studies identify which women in their 40s are most likely to benefit from routine mammograms.

For years, the mantra was that regular mammograms save lives. So many people were stunned in 2009 when an influential panel of experts questioned that assumption.

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Asia
5:04 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

The Current U.S.-China Stanoff Has A Precedent

The current case of a prominent Chinese activist seeking U.S. protection has echoes of a similar episode in 1989. Then, physicist Fang Lizhi took refuge at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. He spent a year there before the U.S. and China reached a deal allowing him to move to the U.S. He died this month in Arizona, at age 76.
John B. Carnett Popular Science via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 5:58 pm

As the U.S. and China seek a solution to the case involving a prominent Chinese activist, it's worth remembering this isn't the first time the two countries have waged this kind of negotiation.

Chen Guangcheng, an activist who's been blind since he was a small boy, escaped house arrest in an eastern Chinese village and was taken to Beijing, where he's believed to be under U.S. protection.

A similar, high-profile case took place in 1989, when astrophysicist Fang Lizhi and his wife took refuge at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.

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